Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘twentieth-century disease

Sunday! Night! Links!

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* …these acts of apparent choice have had their meaning hollowed out. The real decisions are taken elsewhere. We have become squatters in the ruins of the great democratic societies of the past.

Ask yourself this: Do you know the name of any one of the victims killed in the West Chemical and Fertilizer Company disaster? Do you know how many of them there were? Their ages, aspirations, what they looked like, whether they left behind children or what messages they last posted on Facebook? Do you know if there is an explanation yet for what caused the explosion? Or if investigators are still searching for one?

Inside a mile-deep open-pit copper mine after a catastrophic landslide.

How the hyperkinetic media is breeding a new generation of terrorists.

You’re Eight Times More Likely to be Killed by a Police Officer than a Terrorist, and other facts.

* Sympathy as social performance.

Privacy is ‘off the table’ in a ‘post-9/11 world,’ says New York City police chief.

“You’re never going to know where all of our cameras are,” Bloomberg said. “And that’s one of the ways you deter people; they just don’t know whether the person sitting next to you is just somebody sitting there or a detective watching.”

From a broader series begun in 1997, the photographs in this suite are the result of mean averaging every Playboy centerfold foldout for the four decades beginning Jan. 1960 through Dec. 1999. This tracks, en masse, the evolution of this form of portraiture.

* Michelle Rhee’s StudentsFirst Selects Author of Tennessee’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill as ‘Reformer of the Year.’

Parents are confining sons and daughters to their homes, even if it means keeping them away from friends. Schools are canceling outdoor activities and field trips. Parents with means are choosing schools based on air-filtration systems, and some international schools have built gigantic, futuristic-looking domes over sports fields to ensure healthy breathing. In China, Breathing Becomes a Childhood Risk.

EPA: More than half of U.S. rivers unsuitable for aquatic life.

What is Causing Iran’s Spike in MS Cases?
 Vitamin D deficiency from lack of sunlight could be an unexpected long-term consequence of the Iranian revolution
.

* Alyson Provax’s Time-Wasting Experiment.

* When the US tried to weaponize the weather.

The “electrosensitive” are moving to a cellphone-free town. But is their disease real?

Quick Links

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* 4th laziest state looks a lot better than 37th in child welfare.

* Receipts are coated with BPA and your box spring is conspiring to kill you. Nothing’s going right.

* For the first time in forty years, Congress has repealed a mandatory minimum sentence.

* A federal judge has blocked much of Arizona’s documentation law from taking effect.

The law will still take effect Thursday, but without many of the provisions that angered opponents — including sections that required officers to check a person’s immigration status while enforcing other laws. The judge also put on hold a part of the law that required immigrants to carry their papers at all times, and made it illegal for undocumented workers to solicit employment in public places.

* Bill O’Reilly: America-hating hippie.

* How Glenn Beck cons his viewers (Goldline edition). Via MeFi.

* There is no good reason on Earth to oppose the DREAM Act.

* There is no good reason on Earth to continue making Battlestar Galactica spinoffs.

* There is every reason in the world to make a Quantum Leap film. Please do this.

* Conservatives may be willing to shrug off the possibility of rising sea levels, desertification and mass extinctions, but can they live with the risk of more Mexicans crossing the border to breathe their precious American air?

* Hopefully not while we’re there next week: “Liverpool Disappears for a Billionth of a Second.”

* I bet the $45 was well-spent.

* Oil spills, oil spills.

* To avenge Paul the psychic octopus, we must invade Iran.

* And Wookieleaks is your best source for anti-Imperial news.

Sunday Links

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As my never-ending semester draws no closer to its promised close, I present you with Sunday links.

* My good friend Ryan Vu has a long piece in this week’s Independent about alternative mapmakers and “what Google Earth doesn’t show you.”

* Desperate Hillary to Barack: “Next vote wins.”

* Fay’s brother Austin is profiled in the New York Times regarding his book, The Secular Conscience, which I saw him read from the other day.

* Gertrude Stein’s “Reflections on the Atom Bomb” from 1946.

They asked me what I thought of the atomic bomb. I said I had not been able to take any interest in it.

I like to read detective and mystery stories. I never get enough of them but whenever one of them is or was about death rays and atomic bombs I never could read them. What is the use, if they are really as destructive as all that there is nothing left and if there is nothing there nobody to be interested and nothing to be interested about. If they are not as destructive as all that then they are just a little more or less destructive than other things and that means that in spite of all destruction there are always lots left on this earth to be interested or to be willing and the thing that destroys is just one of the things that concerns the people inventing it or the people starting it off, but really nobody else can do anything about it so you have to just live along like always, so you see the atomic [bomb] is not at all interesting, not any more interesting than any other machine, and machines are only interesting in being invented or in what they do, so why be interested. I never could take any interest in the atomic bomb, I just couldn’t any more than in everybody’s secret weapon. That it has to be secret makes it dull and meaningless. Sure it will destroy a lot and kill a lot, but it’s the living that are interesting not the way of killing them, because if there were not a lot left living how could there be any interest in destruction. Alright, that is the way I feel about it. They think they are interested about the atomic bomb but they really are not not any more than I am. Really not. They may be a little scared, I am not so scared, there is so much to be scared of so what is the use of bothering to be scared, and if you are not scared the atomic bomb is not interesting. Everybody gets so much information all day long that they lose their common sense. They listen so much that they forget to be natural. This is a nice story.

* Questions you never thought to ask: How is Barack Obama like a tech startup?

* And in science news, a group in New Mexico claims they’re allergic to Wi-Fi, and is suing to have it banned, while huge cracks are developing in the Arctic ice.

Written by gerrycanavan

May 25, 2008 at 3:03 pm