Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘Tim Pawlenty

Sunday Night Links

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* As I mentioned on Twitter earlier: If it weren’t for this, I’d say Mitt Romney had a better-than-even chance of being elected president next year. The Obama administration just seems hopelessly lost; every failure of their triangulation strategy is only proof they need to triangulate harder.

* The Obama for America fundraiser I spoke with tonight seemed totally unsurprised by my “I’m not giving you any money. I’ll vote for the guy but that’s it” stance. Judging from her response, as well as what people are saying to me on Twitter and Facebook, it’s a line she’s heard before.

* Guestbloggers doing great work during Glenn Greenwald’s vacation: Income inequality is bad for rich people too. Austerity and the roots of Britain’s turmoil. Why “business needs certainty” is destructive.

* Nouriel ‘Dr. Doom’ Roubini: ‘Karl Marx Was Right.’

* Who mourns for Tim Pawlenty?

* Is Verizon the next Wisconsin? Maybe, but I’m hoping Wisconsin is still Wisconsin for a while. Via LGM.

* Looks like the shine is off “Twitter revolutions.”

“Everyone watching these horrific actions will be struck by how they were organized via social media,” Cameron said in an emergency session of Parliament on Thursday, during which he announced that officials were working with the intelligence services and police to look at how and whether to “stop people communicating via these Web sites and services when we know they are plotting violence, disorder and criminality.”

Cameron said: “Free flow of information can be used for good. But it can also be used for ill. And when people are using social media for violence, we need to stop them.”

* “You can’t reach for the stars at this point”: Generation Vexed. Via MeFi.

Since mid-2008, unemployment in the 16-to-24 age group has been 13% and higher, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Last month, it stood at 17.4%.

Dim job prospects have taken some of the sheen off advanced degrees.

The job situation could haunt young people for years, said Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston.

More than half of earnings growth over a lifetime happens in the first decade of a career, meaning that early unemployment can depress future wages for life, he said.

But older workers are staying longer in their jobs, forcing twentysomethings to fill up retail, fast-food and other part-time spaces that traditionally give teens their first paycheck. Without work experience, young job seekers will need to scramble for options, he said.

* Seven Creepy Experiments That Could Teach Us So Much (If They Weren’t So Wrong)—and the forbidden experiment doesn’t even make the list.

* And “urban renewal,” c. 1850: 19th-c. African-American village unearthed in what is now NYC’s Central Park.

Thursday! Wisconsin, Optical Illusions, the Death of the Public University, and More

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* Some genuinely breaking news: Wisconsin’s anti-union bill was just struck down for violating the state’s open meetings law.

* …the curious thing about this report is that it dances around policy questions, but doesn’t ask a single one directly, or name a single policy that has shaped the higher education landscape.  “The public” is asked to confine its thoughts to individual success; “college presidents” are asked to ruminate on the mission of college.  But the two are never articulated as part of the same system, or as having a mutual set of interests that are social and organically intertwined.  And this, I would argue, is because neoliberal government policies, and right-wing political demagoguery, have sold the ideology of “low taxes” and “small government” so successfully that the moral commitment of the state to nurture an educated citizenry has entirely evaporated from the equation.

Ohio hates John Kasich. But GOP voters love Herman Cain; he’s outpolling Pawlenty now, and nearly tied with Gingrich and Ron Paul.

* Steve Benen notes that Jon Huntsman is so liberal he could probably be a credible candidate in the Democratic primary in 2016. As I noted on Twitter the sad thing is that’s really as strong an argument against Democrats as it is for Huntsman.

* And just a little bit of awesome: your optical illusions of the year.

Sunday Morning Post-Rapture Links

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* Pharyngula, buzzkill, makes the whole “Rapture” craze this weekend seem a lot less funny. At least we’ll always have alternative_eschatology.jpg.

* The headline reads: “Utah law makes acting sexy illegal.” Just don’t tell the atheists.

* How a third-party Palin run might benefit the GOP.

* How the Big Bird puppet works. I don’t know that I ever really thought enough about this to have a “theory” on how Big Bird works, but I definitely thought Big Bird was more of a suit than a puppet—which I realize in retrospect is about as close to “I always thought Big Bird was real” as an adult can comfortably get.

* Mitch Daniels won’t run. This is very good news for Pawlenty, who looks increasingly unbeatable—though a number of my right-wing relatives who used to think experience was the most important qualification for the presidency seem quite enraptured with pizza magnate Herman Cain. The rest of my Republican relatives appear, unbelievably, to be waiting for Jeb.

* Mark Schmitt on intergenerational warfare from Paul Ryan and the GOP. Via Matt Yglesias, who highlights once again the centrality of 1973/1974 as the key turning point in U.S. economic and political history.

* More intergenerational warfare from the GOP: Newt wants poll tests for “young people.”

* And a single, striking thought: what if all the objections to Marx’s thought are mistaken?

Thursday Night Links

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Links without Context or Content

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Where Have All the Republicans Gone?

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Mark Halprin, master of D.C. conventional wisdom, points out that only two GOP candidates are currently making serious efforts to run for president in 2012: Mitt Romney, a second-rate candidate whose chances have likely already been scuttled by Romneycare’s structural similarities to Obamacare, and Minnesota’s Tim Pawlenty, a “virtual unknown.” The best bit:

And despite his years in the national spotlight, Romney remains unexpectedly unfamiliar to a large number of Americans. On a recent cross-country trip, as I read Romney’s new best seller, No Apology, which features a close-up photo of the author on the front cover, a passing flight attendant exclaimed, “No apology? Not even for his wife?” If Romney can so easily be confused with disgraced politician John Edwards, he’ll have to work harder to create a more distinct identity if he hopes to win the White House.

Via Ben Smith, who also notes another round of Obama/West Wing fanfic.

Written by gerrycanavan

April 5, 2010 at 10:21 am

Late Night Links With Very Little Context

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