Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘the secular progressive swing vote

Some More Friday Links

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* For a few hours on this Saturday afternoon, the incarcerated fathers will be allowed to take part in an American tradition, the father-daughter dance. “A Dance of Their Own,” thought to be the only event of its kind in the country, will be in the jail’s small, windowless multipurpose room.

* Gerontocracy watch: Will Old People Take Over the World? Oh, what would the world be like if old people ran it for their own benefit at the expense of the young! Truly chilling to think about.

* …they did not find households easily shifting up and down the inequality scale. Instead, they found “the advantaged becoming permanently better-off, while the disadvantaged becoming permanently worse-off.” For men, the added inequality was entirely of the permanent sort. For households, three-quarters was permanent.

* Langston Hughes’ Collection of Harlem Rent Party Advertisements.

* Bonnet Rippers: The Rise of the Amish Romance Novel.

* When J.J. Abrams almost made Superman.

Twinsters is a project on Kickstarter by a pair of women who look very similar, were both born in South Korea, both born on November 19, 1987, both adopted three months after birth, and have never met. It’s the most compelling Facebook family reunion since last week’s aunt and niece.

O’Reilly Sounds The Alarm About The Left’s War Against The Easter Bunny.

So, if the far left can marginalize Santa and the Easter bunny, of they can tell the children those symbols are obsolete and unnecessary, they then set the stage for a totally secular society in the future.

Who told him our plan?

And a set of Penguin style book covers re-imagined for Quentin Tarantino screenplays.

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What’s Happening with MA-SEN?

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Pretty much everyone has now defaulted to “toss-up,” though there are some reasons for Democrats to hope. Josh Marshall matches my sense that renewed enthusiasm on the Dem side may have finally arrested Brown’s momentum, but maybe not in time. (More on that point, and the race in general, here.) Nate Silver tries to put a happy face on things with a post arguing that a blue-state effect could push Coakley over the top, and Chris Bowers has been pushing his own ad-hoc statistical method that he says proves Coakley is still the favorite. But this could all just be wishful thinking.

I’ll predict a Coakley win, but not a big one, and I’ll be pretty nervous Tuesday night. My only real comments about this fiasco are what I tweeted the other night: (1) The Massachusetts Senate race proves there is *literally nothing* Democratic Party leaders can’t screw up and (2) I feel like I, a nonreligious anti-military vegetarian socialist who doesn’t live in the state, could win a Senate race in Massachusetts if I were running as a Democrat. I have no idea how the Democratic leadership could let the Coakley campaign bomb this badly. Wake up, y’all.

Energizing

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Will progressives finally get their Cabinet pick in the form of Steven Chu at Energy? More at DKos. If we’re only going to get one Cabinet pick, I guess I’m glad it’s Energy…

Written by gerrycanavan

December 10, 2008 at 9:13 pm

After the Flood

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Trying to puzzle out John McCain’s motive for the campaign suspension stunt is proving rather difficult. A lot of people are looking to Palin, both her disastrous Katie Couric interview and the repeated suggestion that hey, you know, we could just cancel the VP debate. (On the margins, Palin’s so-called “preacher problem” is also showing up in these discussions; she definitely loses the secular progressive swing vote with this one.) Or maybe, others venture, he’s trying to cover up his own lack of debate preparation. Still other people think he may be trying to keep the Rick Davis story out of the papers, as there’s now word that Rick Davis didn’t sever his relationship with his lobbying firm and is in fact still listed as one of its only two officers. And a lot of people just point to the polls—witness as just one example a Rasmussen poll that now puts Obama ahead right here in North Carolina (!). Or maybe we should just bring it all back, as Steve Benen does, to the fundamental question that recurs about so much of John McCain’s gambles: cynicism, or risk addiction?

Whatever it is, it’s worth noting that McCain has pulled this very stunt at least twice before.

Reactions have been legion, almost all of them negative, but Noam Scheiber in particular is on fire with posts that suggest just how badly this may backfire on McCain, comparing it first to a form of political hari-kari and then pointing out elsewhere the way in which the gambit automatically defeats itself:

“Tomorrow morning, I will suspend my campaign and return to Washington after speaking at the Clinton Global Initiative.”

Clinton Global Intiative > financial crisis > longstanding-to-the-point-of-sacred tradition of nationally televised presidential debate? This will not stand.