Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘sitcoms

Writing Your Sitcom Pilot

leave a comment »

The Scene Where the Sexy Female Lead Is Caught Naked.

How exactly your female lead will end up unintentionally naked is up to you, but bear in mind that the situation will reveal a great deal about the kind of sexy young woman she is…

Written by gerrycanavan

January 5, 2011 at 3:05 pm

Nothing Can Save Us Now

leave a comment »

* In the spirit of Lost 1967, Lost the Sitcom.

* The stimulus worked; it just wasn’t big enough.

* Terrible people saying terrible things: How the GOP’s deregulatory health-care solution would just make things worse.

* By the time you read this, the 39-year-old Ford will either be a serious candidate for the Senate seat (with his eye on the White House) or a footnote in New York’s long history of oddball and carpetbagger campaigns. But more interesting than Ford himself are the characters egging him on: Mayor Michael Bloomberg, pollster Douglas Schoen, and Joe Trippi, the Internet-politics whiz who ran Howard Dean’s and John Edwards’ presidential campaigns. These men and others represent a kind of perpetual, recurring dream in American politics that some sort of Brand X candidate or third party, transcending all known partisan divides, will emerge. Ford was merely the latest vessel for this fantasy. Via Ezra Klein, who posits Evan Bayh as the next vessel after Ford.

* Breaking: Voters don’t make rational decisions. (Via Barker.)

Human groups are unusual among primates in that our leaders are often democratically selected. Faces affect hiring decisions and could influence voting behavior. Here, we show that facial appearance has important effects on choice of leader. We show that differences in facial shape alone between candidates can predict who wins or loses in an election (Study 1) and that changing context from war time to peace time can affect which face receives the most votes (Study 2). Our studies highlight the role of face shape in voting behavior and the role of personal attributions in face perception. We also show that there may be no general characteristics of faces that can win votes, demonstrating that face traits and information about the environment interact in choice of leader.