Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘Roger Ebert

For His Unwavering Devotion to Weekend Links, Gerry Canavan Has Been Awarded the Nobel Prize for Linkblogging

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* Every so often the Nobel Committee accidentally picks a genuinely deserving, genuinely inspiring recipient of the Peace Prize. This year was one. A 2013 profile of Malala Yousafzai. A speech to Pakistani Marxists. What did one Nobel laureate say to the other?

* Every so often the Supreme Court accidentally makes a good decision. Last night’s overturning of Wisconsin’s voter suppression law was one.

* What would the twentieth-century history of English studies look like if we had thought to preserve the records of our teaching? How could that history be different if we had institutional archives of syllabi, student notes, lecture drafts, handouts and seminar papers, just as we have archives of journal articles, drafts of novels, recordings of performances, and committee meeting minutes? What if universities had collected classroom documents alongside other records and traces of the knowledge they create and culture that they value?

* Another lovely Chomsky rant on the university.

So the university imposes costs on students and on faculty who are not only untenured but are maintained on a path that guarantees that they will have no security. All of this is perfectly natural within corporate business models. It’s harmful to education, but education is not their goal.

* Recent cuts have unfortunately made future cuts inevitable: The University of Wisconsin System is about to do some wholesale, strategic belt-tightening, according to its president. But it’s not all absolutely miserable news:

Regent Janice Mueller noted that of the $1.6 billion total paid to unclassified staff on UW campuses, faculty accounted for $550 million, leaving more than $1 billion going to non-faculty. “That seemed a little out of whack to me,” Mueller said. “I would think faculty salaries would be the larger share.”

I didn’t think Regents were allowed to notice things that like.

* A new law that more strongly prohibits discrimination against pregnant graduate students could be coming to a state near you.

The Excessive Political Power Of White Men In The United States, In One Chart.

* Phil Maciak on the greatness of Transparent.

* Why we need academic freedom: On Being Sued.

* Neoliberalism is the triumph of the state, not its retreat. The case of Mexico.

On the cultural ideology of Big Data.

It Would Actually Be Very Simple To End Homelessness Forever.

* It seems that all of Pearson’s critical foundational research and proven classroom results in the world couldn’t get the question 3 x 7 x 26 correct.

* Federal spending was lower this year than Paul Ryan originally asked for. Ha, take that Republicans! Another Obama-led triumph for the left!

* But things will be different once Obama finally becomes president. Obama Plans to Close Guantanamo Whether Congress Likes It Or Not.

* Nightmares: Could Enterovirus D68 Be Causing Polio-Like Paralysis in Kids?

* NYC airport workers walk off job, protesting lack of protection from Ebola risks.

* SF in everything: Malware needs to know if it’s in the Matrix.

* Lady Ghostbusters will be a reboot, almost assuredly a terrible one.

I love origin stories. That’s my favorite thing. I love the first one so much I don’t want to do anything to ruin the memory of that. So it just felt like, let’s just restart it because then we can have new dynamics. I want the technology to be even cooler. I want it to be really scary, and I want it to happen in our world today that hasn’t gone through it so it’s like, oh my God what’s going on?

* It’s happening again: Vastly Different Stories Emerging In Police Shooting Of St. Louis Teen. The Associated Press is On It:

* Baton Rouge officer who texted about ‘pulling a Ferguson’ allowed to retire, can still work as a cop.

* Teenagers in prison have a shockingly high suicide rate.

* Roger Ebert: The Collected Wikipedia Edits.

* The many faces of capitalism.

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* The University of Wisconsin at Madison Police Department issued an apology Wednesday after a list of safety tips posted to the department’s website was criticized for appearing to blame victims of campus crimes, particularly survivors of sexual assault.

* What We Talk About When We Talk About Trigger Warnings.

* Today in theology: Europe’s history of penis worship was cast aside when the Catholic Church decided Jesus’s foreskin was too potent to control.

By the 15th century, the Holy Prepuce had become the desirous object of many mystics’ visions. Bridget of Sweden recorded the revelations she received from the Virgin Mary, who told the saint that she saved the foreskin of her son and carried it with her until her death. Catherine of Siena, the patron saint of Italy, imagined that her wedding ring—exchanged with the Savior in a mystical marriage—had been transmuted into the foreskin. In her Revelationes (c. 1310), Saint Agnes Blannbekin recounts the hours she spent contemplating the loss of blood the infant Christ must have suffered during the circumcision, and during one of her contemplative moments, while idly wondering what had become of the foreskin, she felt the prepuce pressed upon her tongue. Blannbekin recounted the sweet, intoxicating taste, and she attempted to swallow it. The saint found herself unable to digest the Holy Prepuce; every time she swallowed, it immediately reappeared on her tongue. Again and again she repeated the ritual until after a hundred gulps she managed to down the baby Jesus’ cover.

* LEGO, against oil.

* Two Bad Tastes That Taste Bad Together: The US Doesn’t Have Enough Railroads to Keep Up With the Oil Boom.

* For some unfathomable reason somebody handed Cary Nelson another shovel: A Civility Manifesto.

* Science proves that in female-dominated societies men have to work twice as hard to destroy everything with their bullshit.

* Another piece on the law and Tommy the Chimp.

* Trick or treat.

* And maybe there are some doors we just shouldn’t open: I’m Slavoj Žižek, AMA.

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Friday Night Links

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Income inequality, as seen from space.

* Maxim’s oral history of The Wire.

* Robert Ebert reviews Moonrise Kingdom.

Wes Anderson’s mind must be an exciting place for a story idea to be born. It immediately becomes more than a series of events and is transformed into a world with its own rules, in which everything is driven by emotions and desires as convincing as they are magical.

* The Cup of Coffee Club: Major league baseball players with just one start. The president, surely, is Larry Yount:

Yount holds the unique distinction of being the only pitcher in MLB history to appear in the official record books without ever actually having faced a batter. In his only major league appearance on September 15, 1971, he had to leave the game during his warm-up pitches due to injury.

* Doug Henwood: The New York Fed is out with its credit report for the first quarter of 2012. It shows student debt bucking the trend (“Student Loan Debt Continues to Grow”), rising while all other kinds of debt fell from the end of last year. Student debt, at $904 billion (not yet the much-advertised trillion), is now considerably larger than credit card and auto debt. A decade ago, student debt was a less than half credit cards and autos.

ThinkProgress looks at the Catholic Church’s case against the contraception mandate.

* And the U.S.’s crack cyberterrorism division gets caught with its pants down.

Tuesday Links – 2

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* Nate Silver sets out to quantify the electoral impact of killing bin Laden.

* Ezra Klein with the latest on health care reform and the courts.

* Krugman: So, let’s get this right: the adults are the people who, bad manners aside, don’t know the first thing about the programs they’re so eager to dismantle. And we’re supposed to take their advice because they’re wise men, don’t you know.

* Elitot Spitzer on the Republican war against the weak.

* And Roger Ebert weighs in on the class war.

If it is “socialist” to believe in a more equal distribution of income, what is the word for the system we now live under? A system under which the very rich have doubled their share of the nation’s income in 25 years? I believe in a fair day’s work for a fair day’s pay. Isn’t that an American credo? How did it get twisted around into an obscene wage for shameless plunder?

Belatedly Closing Some Tabs

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* When Breitbart says “Jump!”, the Obama administration asks how high. Humiliating. They should reinstate Shirley Sherrod tomorrow and call Breitbart and Fox out by name. More links and discussion at MetaFilter.

* Surprising: The generic Congressional ballot again favors the Democrats. Steve Benen says caveat emptor. Could this have something to do with their bizarre new “rehabilitate Bush” strategy?

* How Roger Ebert destroyed film criticism.

* How the universe might handle time travel paradoxes.

* Climate change whip count. Doesn’t look good.

* Sarah Palin has a 76% favorability rating among Republicans. If the economy hasn’t significantly recovered by 2012 she could really be president, folks.

* Constance McMillen has received $35,000 from her Mississippi school district. I thought the damages might be higher.

* Arizona, desperate for me to like it again, has disabled all its speed cameras.

* Friends don’t let friends commit confirmation treason.

* Rumors of the next Superman film.

* The Catholic Church’s official impotence index.

* And Glenn Beck says he’s going blind. I wouldn’t wish it on anyone.


What Is It, Thursday?

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* Via my once and future roommate Tim: 7 unproduced screenplays by famous intellectuals.

* Meet the Great Atlantic Garbage Patch.

* But let’s be very clear: our legislative process–which allows parochial short-term interests and massive corporate lobbies to undermine the long-term common interests–has proven shockingly inadequate to the monumental task before us: the preservation of the conditions of life for much of the human species.

* Hard to believe we’re still trying to get whaling banned.

* To the future or to the past, to a time when thought is free, when men are different from one another and do not live alone — to a time when truth exists and what is done cannot be undone: From the age of uniformity, from the age of solitude, from the age of Big Brother, from the age of doublethink — greetings! Future generations are reading your tweets.

* Words circled by David Foster Wallace in his American Heritage Dictionary.

* Joss Whedon to rewrite Captain America too? Marvel could definitely put worse people in charge of its film franchise.

* Roger Ebert declares Kick-Ass “morally reprehensible.” I’m pretty sure I have to see it now.

* Zonal Marking: a soccer blog. Highlights here.

* And In Living Color is twenty. I am become old. So old.

Already Thursday! How?

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* Brian K. Vaughn, you had me at “post-apocalyptic heist movie.”

* “You’d better sit down,” he said. “The finger is not human.”

* Disgraced Pope to be quietly reassigned to another Vatican on the other side of the state.

* Glenn Beck Bingo.

* Welcome to the official Twitter page of the Office of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama.

* Thirteen ways of looking at Liz Lemon.

* I linked to this before, years ago, but here it is again: Kurt Vonnegut on the impossibility of telling the difference between good news and bad.

Alien v. Winnie the Pooh.

* And Roger Ebert, who admittedly likes every movie he sees, likes Hot Tub Time Machine.

Thursday Daytime Links

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* Alastair Reynolds, Vernor Vinge, Karl Schroeder and Charlie Stross chat about the Singularity. Via MeFi.

* A school district in Pennsylvania is being sued for spying on students in their homes with school-provided laptops. WTF? What lawyer cleared this?

* Duke undergraduates can have their so-called “rights” when they’ve clawed them from my cold, dead hands: Really interesting (and, I think, ambitious) initiative from Duke Student Government. I wonder how it’ll turn out.

* Has the Democratic Party had a secret brain/spine transplantation? The OpenLeft whipcount now has 30 Democratic Senators on board for the totally obvious step of using reconciliation to pass health care, with an additional 17 officially on board with the Clyburn-tested, Canavan-approved step of using reconciliation to reinsert the public option.

* GOP to filibuster jobs bills entirely on procedural grounds. These guys should definitely be put back in charge. P.S.: There’s no way they’ll ratify a test ban treaty, either.

* Thomas Geoghegan at Democracy Now on killing the filibuster.

* Two more high-ranking Taliban commanders have been captured in Pakistan.

* The odds a United States president owned slaves are 1 in 3.58. Via Eric Barker.

* Eat the rich: 400 families “earned” $345 million each in 2007. Taxing these 400 families at the marginal tax rate of 1951 would net an additional 125 billion dollars for the federal government each year, which by itself would more than pay for health care. of course, that’s just my opening bid; I’m open to compromise. For instance we could split the difference between 91% (1951) and 35% (today) at 63%—this would net $87 billion a year, also enough to pay for health care by itself.

* And every blog on the Internet is required to link to the Esquire Roger Ebert profile, as well as Ebert’s reply on his blog. Consider me in compliance.