Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘revolutions

Thursday Reading™

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screen-capture* It is very hard to accept this — the wealth gap is not a mistake. It is the logical outcome of policy and democratic will. From the streets of Cicero on up, the point was to imprison black people in the black belt and then exploit them. The goal was pursued through public policy, private action, and open terrorism. The goal was accomplished.

* Even college presidents don’t believe in MOOCs.

“An Open Letter to Professor Michael Sandel From the Philosophy Department at San Jose State U.” A writeup at the Chronicle.

Science Fiction in China: A Conversation with Fei Dao.

FD: Chinese sci fi has about a hundred years of history. When it started, in the late Qing dynasty around 1902, it was chiefly concerned with the problem of bringing ancient China into modernity. At that time, Liang Qichao [translated sci fi] because he thought it would be beneficial for China’s future … as something that could popularize scientific knowledge. And Lu Xun thought that if you gave ordinary people scientific literature to read, they would fall asleep. But if you blended scientific knowledge into stories with a plot, it would be more interesting. [He thought that] in this way, the people could become more modern.

Chris Beckett wins Arthur C. Clarke award for Dark Eden. Probably the first book I’ll read once the semester is over, thanks to @shaviro’s great paper on it at ICFA.

* The Pope against capitalism.

* Obama against labor.

* Obama against legal weed dispensaries, despite like a dozen promises not to do this anymore.

* See no evil, hear no evil: Republicans propose abolishing the unemployment rate.

* Previously on The Walking Dead.

* Profit Still Rare, Expenses Still Rising at Athletic Programs.

One Woman’s Crusade Against Revenge Porn.

* Administrators are maniacs: School Conducts Surprise Shooting Drill with Real Gunmen Firing Blanks.

Rumor: Koch Brothers to buy 8 major newspapers, including LA Times.

* And a staggering 44% of Republicans believe armed revolution against the government may soon be necessary.

Sunday Night Links

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* As I mentioned on Twitter earlier: If it weren’t for this, I’d say Mitt Romney had a better-than-even chance of being elected president next year. The Obama administration just seems hopelessly lost; every failure of their triangulation strategy is only proof they need to triangulate harder.

* The Obama for America fundraiser I spoke with tonight seemed totally unsurprised by my “I’m not giving you any money. I’ll vote for the guy but that’s it” stance. Judging from her response, as well as what people are saying to me on Twitter and Facebook, it’s a line she’s heard before.

* Guestbloggers doing great work during Glenn Greenwald’s vacation: Income inequality is bad for rich people too. Austerity and the roots of Britain’s turmoil. Why “business needs certainty” is destructive.

* Nouriel ‘Dr. Doom’ Roubini: ‘Karl Marx Was Right.’

* Who mourns for Tim Pawlenty?

* Is Verizon the next Wisconsin? Maybe, but I’m hoping Wisconsin is still Wisconsin for a while. Via LGM.

* Looks like the shine is off “Twitter revolutions.”

“Everyone watching these horrific actions will be struck by how they were organized via social media,” Cameron said in an emergency session of Parliament on Thursday, during which he announced that officials were working with the intelligence services and police to look at how and whether to “stop people communicating via these Web sites and services when we know they are plotting violence, disorder and criminality.”

Cameron said: “Free flow of information can be used for good. But it can also be used for ill. And when people are using social media for violence, we need to stop them.”

* “You can’t reach for the stars at this point”: Generation Vexed. Via MeFi.

Since mid-2008, unemployment in the 16-to-24 age group has been 13% and higher, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Last month, it stood at 17.4%.

Dim job prospects have taken some of the sheen off advanced degrees.

The job situation could haunt young people for years, said Andrew Sum, director of the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston.

More than half of earnings growth over a lifetime happens in the first decade of a career, meaning that early unemployment can depress future wages for life, he said.

But older workers are staying longer in their jobs, forcing twentysomethings to fill up retail, fast-food and other part-time spaces that traditionally give teens their first paycheck. Without work experience, young job seekers will need to scramble for options, he said.

* Seven Creepy Experiments That Could Teach Us So Much (If They Weren’t So Wrong)—and the forbidden experiment doesn’t even make the list.

* And “urban renewal,” c. 1850: 19th-c. African-American village unearthed in what is now NYC’s Central Park.