Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘Picasso

Picasso’s X-Nica

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I’ve always felt Picasso’s X-nica was deeply underrated. To this day no one has captured the mutant tragedy like he did.

More alternate-history comics here.

Written by gerrycanavan

June 15, 2012 at 1:41 pm

So I Think That’s Pretty Much Everyone

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Written by gerrycanavan

June 15, 2011 at 2:28 pm

Art! Intrigue! Picasso!

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Staggering Cache Of Picassos Turns Up In France. But there’s more:

Mr Le Guennec claims that he was given the collection by the artist when he carried out odd jobs for him at his Côte d’Azur home 40 years ago. 

However, Picasso’s son, Claude, suspects that the works were stolen.

Via MeFi.

Written by gerrycanavan

November 29, 2010 at 3:20 pm

How to Spend $65 Million without Really Trying

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Written by gerrycanavan

January 26, 2010 at 9:44 am

A Few More

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A few more.

* #Nabokovfail.

* Scenes from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch.

* Nations must invest $37 trillion in energy technologies by 2030 to stabilize greenhouse gas emissions at sustainable levels and meet energy needs, the International Energy Agency warned today.

* A woman is six times more likely to be separated or divorced soon after a diagnosis of cancer or multiple sclerosis than if a man in the relationship is the patient, according to a study that examined the role gender played in so-called “partner abandonment.”

* Picasso and his love of Japanese erotic prints.

* Always start your viral marketing campaign after your show is already doomed.

* The New Yorker takes down Superfreakonomics. I like this coda from Crooked Timber a lot:

Kolbert’s closing words are, however, a little unfair.

To be skeptical of climate models and credulous about things like carbon-eating trees and cloudmaking machinery and hoses that shoot sulfur into the sky is to replace a faith in science with a belief in science fiction. This is the turn that “SuperFreakonomics” takes, even as its authors repeatedly extoll their hard-headedness. All of which goes to show that, while some forms of horseshit are no longer a problem, others will always be with us.

Not unfair to Levitt and Dubner, mind you, but to science fiction. After all, two science fiction authors, Frederick Pohl and Cyril Kornbluth, had their number down way back in 1953 with The Space Merchants (Pohl, amazingly, is still active and alive).

The Conservationists were fair game, those wild eyed zealots who pretended modern civilization was in some way “plundering” our planet. Preposterous stuff. Science is always a step ahead of the failure of natural resources. After all, when real meat got scarce, we had soyaburgers ready. When oil ran low, technology developed the pedicab.

The Space Merchants is truly great, incidentally. Read it if you haven’t.

* Twenty years after the Berlin Wall. The “click to fade” images are stunning.

Friday Friday Megalinkdump

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It’s Friday, and I’ve been saving some special links to mark the occasion.

* A 3-D exploration of Picasso’s Guernica. Via MeFi.

* 7 reasons why sci-fi book series outstay their welcome.

* The top twenty-five Batman stories of all time. That Dark Knight Returns only clocked in at #25 may surprise you, but once you know that it’s no real shock that Alan Moore takes the #1 slot for The Killing Joke, the story that saw Batgirl shot in the back by the Joker and confined to a wheelchair for life.

* The L.A. Times has an interview with Joss Whedon about Dollhouse. There’s been a lot of hype about this show lately—the news that it’s been given the post-24 timeslot, the news that there will only be five minutes of commercials per hour, a teaser clip at io9.com—so much hype, in fact, that I almost believe Fox isn’t planning to air the episodes out of order and then cancel it after 7 episodes. Almost.

* The physics of anime.

#12 – Law of Phlogistatic Emission

Nearly all things emit light from fatal wounds.

#18 – Law of Hemoglobin Capacity

The human body contains over 12 gallons of blood, sometimes more, under high pressure.

#41 – Law of Xylolaceration

Wooden or bamboo swords are just as sharp as metal swords, if not sharper.

* Here’s part of the reason Americans have gotten and are getting so much fatter: portion sizes keep increasing and unit bias induces us to eat everything we’re given.

* Of course, the obesity epidemic affects more than just a single person’s quality of life.

* And via Matt Yglesias, David Brooks explores our Buddhist future. And yet my guess is that the atheism debate is going to be a sideshow. The cognitive revolution is not going to end up undermining faith in God, it’s going to end up challenging faith in the Bible.

Over the past several years, the momentum has shifted away from hard-core materialism. The brain seems less like a cold machine. It does not operate like a computer. Instead, meaning, belief and consciousness seem to emerge mysteriously from idiosyncratic networks of neural firings. Those squishy things called emotions play a gigantic role in all forms of thinking. Love is vital to brain development. Matt makes the smart point the increased concentration of capital (economic, cultural, and otherwise) in China and India will likely accelerate this process greatly.

Written by gerrycanavan

May 16, 2008 at 2:10 pm