Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘Kindle

Hugos

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The Hugo awards were announced last night. Boing Boing has the list, including Ted Chiang’s characteristically excellent novella “The Lifecycle of Software Objects.” I haven’t read the winning Connie Willis novels but I did just impulse-buy both for my Kindle.

I’m also glad to see Lev Grossman won Best New Writer for his very good (especially the first two-thirds) The Magicians; I got the chance to interview Lev recently about his excellent followup, The Magician King, which should be in this week’s Independent Weekly. We mostly talked about fan fiction, building off his defense of the genre in Time here. Look for that soon.

Leavin’ on that Midnight Train Links

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* Here comes the second act: Progressives Target GOP State Senators In WI With Recall Threat.

* Hard to think of a better encapsulation of America’s warped priorities than the chart at right. More here.

* February 21, 2009: My working assumption has been that the GOP’s biggest names—Bobby Jindal, Mitt Romney, god-help-us Sarah Palin—would sit out 2012 to take on the winner of the open Democratic field in 2016. (I’ve actually thought for a while that 2012′s Bob Dole would be Newt Gingrich; someone who’ll lose handily but won’t get creamed.) Ladies and gentlemen, we’re halfway there: Newt Gingrich is running for president.

* Julianna Baggott on answering the illegal question in academic job interviews.

* Ron Rosenbaum on asking the forbidden question in nuclear silo training. (Thanks, Sam!)

The study found that of those fellowship winners with white male dissertation advisers, 37 percent landed faculty jobs at research universities — jobs that many Ph.D.s want and that are very difficult these days for most to get. Of those who had all other dissertation advisers (white women, minority men or minority women), only 7 percent landed such jobs.

* New David Foster Wallace in the New Yorker.

Every whole person has ambitions, objectives, initiatives, goals. This one particular boy’s goal was to be able to press his lips to every square inch of his own body.

* Self-publishing in the age of the Kindle.

* The headline reads, “Can a group of scientists in California end the war on climate change?” But Grist offers some good reasons to be skeptical about the Berkeley Earth project.

* PhysOrg has an article detailing dozens of unethical medical experiments on nonconsenting human subjects in the U.S.

* That’ll fix everything: the Gates Foundation wants to raise class size to “spread around [the] effectiveness.” Sounds foolproof! (Thanks, Ben!)

* Beyond parody: Ohio Senate committee schedules unborn child as witness during upcoming abortion bill hearing.

* And RaShOmoN of course you had me at German science fiction covers.

Utopia Grossband 023Utopia 417

Slow News Day Links

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* Death-of-the-book-watch: Kindle sales have surpassed paperbacks on Amazon.

* “People think of programming as a very male thing,” Erikson said. “Most people don’t know that it was mostly women.”

* What could possibly go wrong? GOP senators target birthright citizenship.

* 198 of the top 200 questions asked during a recent YouTube Town Hall had to do with marijuana and drug policy. Maybe Obama should rethink his answer.

* And Ayn Rand: Communist!

Critics of Social Security and Medicare frequently invoke the words and ideals of author and philosopher Ayn Rand, one of the fiercest critics of federal insurance programs. But a little-known fact is that Ayn Rand herself collected Social Security. She may also have received Medicare benefits.

Via Cynical-C.

OPEN MAILBOX

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Written by gerrycanavan

October 8, 2010 at 12:39 am

Is ‘Freedom’ the Novel of the Century?

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The Week investigates. The hype machine persuaded me to buy the digital edition on my Kindle, so mission accomplished there. I’ll let you know what I think if I ever get around to reading it.

Written by gerrycanavan

September 8, 2010 at 9:42 am

Bad News Saturday

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* The top kill has officially failed.

* Rest in peace, Dennis Hopper.

* Most Likely to Kill is a blog that posts famous people’s yearbook pictures and juvenilia. It is officially the blog I least want to ever wind up on.

* The American military on Saturday released a scathing report on the deaths of 23 Afghan civilians, saying that “inaccurate and unprofessional” reporting by a team of Predator drone operators helped lead to an airstrike this year on a group of innocent men, women and children…. “The strike occurred because the ground force commander lacked a clear understanding of who was in the vehicles, the location, direction of travel, and the likely course of action of the vehicles,” General McHale wrote. Oh, is that all?

* Art from the Hermit Kingdom in Vienna.

* A recent study has found a link between the autism spectrum and non-teleological thinking.

* Good news Saturday: Moving video of an eight-month-old deaf baby hearing sound for the first time after receiving a cochlear implant. Via MeFi, where an interesting discussion about opposition in deaf communities to cochlear implants ensues.

* For my fellow Kindle users: Top 250 Public Domain Kindle Books.

* And the Garden State goes green: medicinal marijuana is legal in New Jersey on July 1.

Up Too Early Central Timezone Blues

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* The paper on ecological debt I’m giving at the Debt conference at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee’s Center for 21st Century Studies today is pretty indebted to Naomi Klein’s recent work on the subject, which can be found at YouTube, Democracy Now, The Nation, and Rolling Stone. I may try to put this talk up as a podcast at some point.

* The oil spill disaster in the Louisiana has turned out to be much, much worse than originally thought: “a river of oil flowing from the bottom of the Gulf at the rate of 210,000 gallons a day that officials say could be running for two months or more.” The final devastation will likely be worse than the Exxon Valdez disaster. The White House says BP will pay the costs of cleanup. Related: Obama Administration Learns That Oil Leads to Oil Spills. At least they’ve quietly reinstated the federal moratorium on offshore drilling as a result of all this. Hope it stays that way.

* Can reconciliation work for climate like it worked for health care? Ezra Klein says not really.

* Ten states, including my beloved North Carolina!, are now considering Arizona-style document laws.

* Speaking of North Carolina, here’s the Independent Weekly voting guide for Durham County. The primary is Tuesday, May 4.

* It turns out the measurement fallacy Cory Doctorow was speaking about in my class’s interview with him has a name: Goodhart’s Law.

* Grad School Necessary To Maintain U.S.’s Global Position. Take that, The Simpsons.

* Republican consultant on Republican 2012 presidential field: “We Have Real [Expletive] Problems.”

* Calling out the real judicial activists.

* Socialphobes of the world unite! Against the telephone.

The telephone was an aberation in human development. It was a 70 year or so period where for some reason humans decided it was socially acceptable to ring a loud bell in someone else’s life and they were expected to come running, like dogs. This was the equivalent of thinking it was okay to walk into someone’s living room and start shouting.

* Books: still greener than e-readers.

* I can’t believe I forgot to celebrate Explicit Legal Pants Day. The rest of the post, on heterosexual privilege in Mississippi, is good too.

Inevitable District 9 sequel coming in two years.

* I’m so old I can remember when the GOP was against involuntary microchip implantation. It was like a week ago.

* And YouTube has the trailer for the feel-good movie of the year.