Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘global warming

Wednesday Links!

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* Some CFPs I posted yesterday: Buffy at 20! SFFTV Call for Reviewers! And Paradoxa 28: “Global Weirding” has officially appeared in the world as well; see a table of contents and our introduction, and then get one of your very own…

* I’m still gathering the loooooing list for the Pioneer Award — so let me know if you know of a peer-reviewed edited collection in SF studies broadly conceived, published in 2016, or a peer-reviewed article on SF published in a non-SF-studies journal, also in 2016!

* Visiting MLA 2017? Can I interest you in #s444?

444. Infinite Jest at Twenty

Saturday, 7 January, 8:30–9:45 a.m., 112A, Pennsylvania Convention Center

A special session

Presiding: Gerry Canavan, Marquette Univ.

1. “Infinite Jest‘s Near Future,” Lee Konstantinou, Univ. of Maryland, College Park

2. “Aesthetics of Trauma in Infinite Jest,” Carrie Shanafelt, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., Teaneck

3. “No Year of Glad: Infinite Jest after 9/13/2008,” Gerry Canavan

Responding: N. Katherine Hayles, Duke Univ.

* I shared that one, so here’s the debunking: The Bad Research Behind the Bogus Claim That North Carolina Is No Longer a Democracy. I guess I relied on the journalistic summaries (classic blunder) didn’t realize how bad the base research was. North Carolina is still not a legitimate democracy, though.

* And while we’re on the subject: The Constitution has strangled American democracy for long enough. We need a constituent assembly.

Drexel, Twitter and Academic Freedom.

* Oh boy: A Turning Point in the Campus Culture Wars? For Some, Trump Raises Hopes.

* Rethinking the legacy of writers who worked with the CIA.

Why saving the congressional ethics office isn’t as big a victory as it seems. At least it was a win!

* Here’s How We Prepare to be Ungovernable in 2017. Six policy ideas that can lay the groundwork for a more progressive America.

Why liberals need to get a grip on Russia.

The coming restaurant crash.

The End of Progressive Neoliberalism.

Rogue One editors reveal which scenes were part of reshoots. Women’s Health and the Fall of the Galactic Republic.

An Interactive Visualization of Every Line in Hamilton.

The 16 Black Panthers Still Behind Bars.

* Twilight of the curly quote.

47% of Jobs Will Disappear in the next 25 Years, According to Oxford University.

* Counterpoint: Why Star Trek: Discovery Belongs on CBS All Access.

* An oral history of the Sokal hoax.

* Towards an abolition ecology.

* Darkest timeline watch: Wisconsin Senate leader says he’s open to toll roads.

* And with 2016 over, a toddler has now shot a person every week in the US for two years straight. We did it, everyone. We did it.

PARADOXA 28 Is Here!

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28coverParadoxa 28 is here! I got my copy in the mail yesterday. A table of contents, submitted for your approval:

* “Introduction” by Gerry Canavan and Andrew Hageman

* Mark Bould, “Not Just Some Viggo Mortensen of Desolated Left Politics: An Interview with China Miéville”

* Andrew Hageman, “The Sick One-Sentence Joke Version of the Last 12,000 Years: A Conversation between Timothy Morton and Jeff VanderMeer” (excerpted at LARB)

* Siobhan Carroll, “The Terror and the Terroir: The Ecological Uncanny in New Weird Exploration Narratives”

* Mindi McMann, “‘There were endings, but none of them were happy’: Exploitation and Authority in Hanya Yanagihara’s The People in the Trees

* David Higgins, “Slow Weird Reverse Colonization: Warren Ellis and Jason Howard’s Trees

* Gerry Canavan, “After Humanity: Science Fiction after Extinction in Vonnegut and Simak”

* Matt Schneider, “Translating the Unthinkable: Global Weirding in A Dark Room,

* Andrew Brown, “Reading Lovecraft at the End of World”

* Salma Monani, “Feeling and Healing Eco-social Catastrophe: The “Horrific” Slipstream of Danis Goulet’s Wakening”

* Alison Sperling’s “Second Skins: A Body-Ecology of Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach Trilogy

* Stephen Shapiro, “The Weird’s World-System: The Long Spiral and Literary-Cultural Studies”

…as well as reviews of Chris Pak’s Terraforming, The Age of Lovecraft edited collection, Lucile Hadžihalilović’s Evolution, and Fredric Jameson’s An American Utopia. Check it out! I’m biased but I think it’s great.

Written by gerrycanavan

January 4, 2017 at 8:00 am

Thursday Links

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* Put this one on humanity’s tombstone: But where the United Nations envisioned environmental reform, some manufacturers of gases used in air-conditioning and refrigeration saw a lucrative business opportunity.

They quickly figured out that they could earn one carbon credit by eliminating one ton of carbon dioxide, but could earn more than 11,000 credits by simply destroying a ton of an obscure waste gas normally released in the manufacturing of a widely used coolant gas. That is because that byproduct has a huge global warming effect. The credits could be sold on international markets, earning tens of millions of dollars a year.

That incentive has driven plants in the developing world not only to increase production of the coolant gas but also to keep it high — a huge problem because the coolant itself contributes to global warming and depletes the ozone layer. That coolant gas is being phased out under a global treaty, but the effort has been a struggle.

* College debt and the upper middle class. Well, that’s almost everyone; can we act now?

* How Much Water Debt Are We Taking On? This Scary Map Shows How Much.

* Male Superheroes See How The Other Side Lives.

“Over the course of fifty episodes, Breaking Bad has turned its fans into some of the worst people on the internet.” This is certainly true with respect to discussions of Skylar, as the piece notes. As my totally 100% accurate quote from fake Vince Gilligan noted last night: “Dear Internet, I literally could not have made it any clearer that Walt is a villain and Skylar one of his many victims.” How is this even up for debate? More Breaking Bad tweets from this morning at Storify.

* Harry Potter Books Out, Fresh Prince of Bel Air In as Gitmo Prisoners’ Entertainment of Choice.

* Returning home from work Wednesday evening, area woman Caitlin Levy suddenly realized that, quite unusually, she had not been harassed or propositioned for sex even once the entire day, the puzzled 28-year-old told reporters.

Noting that she had experienced a lingering sense of ease and safety all day long that “just felt off,” the paralegal told reporters that, strange as it may sound, she somehow could not recall one single instance from the past 10 hours in which she had been gawked at, hit on repeatedly, or otherwise leered at by a male as she conducted her daily routine.

“Huh, that’s weird,” said Levy, remarking on the fact that at no point during her day did a total stranger attempt to provoke her with suggestive language. “No unwanted sexual advances, no creepy comments, no obscene gestures, nothing.”

“Can that be right?” she asked as she ran down a checklist of emotionally scarring behaviors she has been confronted with every day of her life, in some form or another, since age 13. “No, that’s impossible. I must be forgetting something.”

None Dare Call It Sunday Reading

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* How is copyright ruining your fun today? Well, for one thing, it’s keeping you from reading The Last Ringbearer. Via an Atlantic piece on technology in Tolkien, via MetaFilter.

* In the L.A. Times: The human race at 7,000,000,000.

* This won’t go well: science perfects the 3D-printed gun.

* Esquire goes to Altamount, 1970.

* The New York Times interviews the great Alison Bechdel.

* Bombshell: Koch-Funded Study Finds ‘Global Warming Is Real’, ‘On The High End’ And ‘Essentially All’ Due To Carbon Pollution.

* Documentarians who later wished they’d intervened.

* Perry Anderson on democracy in India.

* Meanwhile, in American democracy:

Probably the first post I ever wrote that got actual attention was this one, figuring out just how badly you could lose the popular vote and still win the presidency. (I made a couple minor mistakes, so for the sake of correctness the actual answer is that up to 78.05% of the population can vote for the losing candidate.)

I’d note in particular two things: 1) during the last two months of the 2008 election, just four states got more than half of the time and money from the candidates, at the expense of the rest of the country, and thirty-two states got no visits at all! And 2) the electoral college has failed for more than 5 percent of presidential elections! That’s preposterous. A great nation shouldn’t pick its leader by some goofy hairbrained scheme that breaks down one time in twenty.

That said, the proposed solution (the National Popular Vote compact) is also a goofy, hairbrained scheme that would collapse into crisis the second it ever made a difference. Perhaps a “great nation” shouldn’t be hopelessly bound by two-hundred-year-old political compromises whose terms are effectively impossible to alter or amend.

* Also at Washington Monthly: inflation is really not our problem right now.

We find that electorates punish presidents and governors for severe weather damage. However, we find that these effects are dwarfed by the response of attentive electorates to the actions of their officials.

* The headline reads, “There will be no more professional writers in the future.”

* And just for fun: Miniature People Living in a World of Giant Food by Christopher Boffoli.

Tuesday Night Quick Links

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