Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘environmental justice

Tuesday!

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* C21’s book on Debt is finally almost out. My essay draws on the bits of the Polygraph introduction I wrote and is about ecological debt.

* Syllabus minute: I have W.H. Auden envy.

MOOC Completion Rates: The Data.

* How neoliberal universities build their football stadiums.

Some projections showed Athletics might not be able to make payments starting in the 2030s when the debt service balloons. The debt is structured so that for the next 20 years, Cal only needs to make interest payments on the debt. The principal kicks in in the early 2030s, resulting in payments between $24 million and $37 million per year.

Look, if it’s good enough for an idea man who settled out of court on securities fraud, it’s good enough for me.

* Kent State fires adjunct who built their journalism master’s.

* Ian Morris, psychohistorian.

* What If? on The Twitter Archive of Babel. The Twitter Archive of Babel contains the true story of your life, as well as all the stories of all the lives you didn’t lead….

Proud Species Commits Suicide Rather Than Be Driven To Extinction By Humans.

* A People’s History of “Twist and Shout.”

PPP: Russ Feingold Poised For Comeback, Could Top Scott Walker Next Year.

* Michael Chabon: Dreams are useless bodily effluvia. Nicholson Baker: Dreams are all we have.

* You and I are gonna live forever: 72 is the new 30.

* Settling nerd fights of the 1990s today:  Is This the Smoking Gun Proving Deep Space Nine Ripped Off Babylon 5?

* The Star Wars Heresies: Star Wars and William Blake. Tim Morton’s essay in Green Planets has a similar impulse with respect to Avatar.

* And in even more insane mashup news: WWE Keeps Pressure On Glenn Beck.

Environmental Justice, Today at 2!

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Environmental Justice symposium
January 21, 2011, 2-5 PM
Breedlove Room, Perkins Library, Duke University

Speakers
Peggy M. Shepard (WEACT.ORG)
Manuel Pastor (USC)
Marie Lynn Miranda (Nicholas School)

Organizers
Priscilla Wald
Benjamin Reese

This symposium comes out of our interest in bringing a variety of disciplinary perspectives together to study the questions of environmental racism and environmental justice. This inquiry begins from the premise that environmental risks and dangers as well as benefits affect groups disproportionately. Race, class, and gender inequities regularly find expression in the distribution of environmental resources and dangers. Environmental racism and environmental justice have become increasingly pressing concerns as a range of disasters from Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill to rising environmentally-linked cancer rates have found their way into the mainstream media and popular culture. The study of these questions requires a multi-disciplinary approach, and with this symposium we are building on the unique strengths of Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment, which is already a multi-disciplinary unit, and on the strength of Duke’s faculty across fields in the areas of race, class and gender studies. We hope with this symposium to encourage further collaboration on questions of environmental racism and environmental justice across fields and schools at Duke and the surrounding institutions.

Sponsored by The Nicholas School of the Environment, The Center for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy at the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, The Office for Institutional Equity at Duke University, and American Literature.

This event is open to the public. No prior registration is required.

Written by gerrycanavan

January 21, 2011 at 11:17 am

Reminder: Environmental Justice Symposium This Friday

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Environmental Justice symposium
January 21, 2011, 2-5 PM
Breedlove Room, Perkins Library, Duke University

Speakers
Peggy M. Shepard (WEACT.ORG)
Manuel Pastor (USC)
Marie Lynn Miranda (Nicholas School)

Organizers
Priscilla Wald
Benjamin Reese

This symposium comes out of our interest in bringing a variety of disciplinary perspectives together to study the questions of environmental racism and environmental justice. This inquiry begins from the premise that environmental risks and dangers as well as benefits affect groups disproportionately. Race, class, and gender inequities regularly find expression in the distribution of environmental resources and dangers. Environmental racism and environmental justice have become increasingly pressing concerns as a range of disasters from Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill to rising environmentally-linked cancer rates have found their way into the mainstream media and popular culture. The study of these questions requires a multi-disciplinary approach, and with this symposium we are building on the unique strengths of Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment, which is already a multi-disciplinary unit, and on the strength of Duke’s faculty across fields in the areas of race, class and gender studies. We hope with this symposium to encourage further collaboration on questions of environmental racism and environmental justice across fields and schools at Duke and the surrounding institutions.

Sponsored by The Nicholas School of the Environment, The Center for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy at the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, The Office for Institutional Equity at Duke University, and American Literature.

This event is open to the public. No prior registration is required.

Written by gerrycanavan

January 18, 2011 at 10:20 am

Mark Your Calendars

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Environmental Justice symposium
January 21, 2011, 2-5 PM
Breedlove Room, Perkins Library, Duke University

Speakers
Peggy M. Shepard (WEACT.ORG)
Manuel Pastor (USC)
Marie Lynn Miranda (Nicholas School)

Organizers
Priscilla Wald
Benjamin Reese

This symposium comes out of our interest in bringing a variety of disciplinary perspectives together to study the questions of environmental racism and environmental justice. This inquiry begins from the premise that environmental risks and dangers as well as benefits affect groups disproportionately. Race, class, and gender inequities regularly find expression in the distribution of environmental resources and dangers. Environmental racism and environmental justice have become increasingly pressing concerns as a range of disasters from Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil spill to rising environmentally-linked cancer rates have found their way into the mainstream media and popular culture. The study of these questions requires a multi-disciplinary approach, and with this symposium we are building on the unique strengths of Duke’s Nicholas School of the Environment, which is already a multi-disciplinary unit, and on the strength of Duke’s faculty across fields in the areas of race, class and gender studies. We hope with this symposium to encourage further collaboration on questions of environmental racism and environmental justice across fields and schools at Duke and the surrounding institutions.

Sponsored by The Nicholas School of the Environment, The Center for Genome Ethics, Law & Policy at the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, The Office for Institutional Equity at Duke University, and American Literature.

This event is open to the public.

Written by gerrycanavan

January 5, 2011 at 5:00 pm

Milwaukee Has Certainly Had Its Share of Visitors

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Wayne Campbell: So, do you come to Milwaukee often?
Alice Cooper: Well, I’m a regular visitor here, but Milwaukee has certainly had its share of visitors. The French missionaries and explorers began visiting here in the late 16th century.
Pete: Hey, isn’t “Milwaukee” an Indian name?
Alice Cooper: Yes, Pete, it is. In fact, it’s pronounced “mill-e-wah-que,” which is Algonquin for “the good land.”
Wayne Campbell: I was not aware of that.
Alice Cooper: I think one of the most interesting things about Milwaukee is that it’s the only American city to elect three Socialist mayors.
Wayne Campbell: [to the camera] Does this guy know how to party or what?

I’m off to Mill-e-wah-que for a conference at the Center for 21st Century Studies on Debt; my paper is “Debt, Theft, Permaculture: Justice and Ecological Scale.” Blogging will be very light. I’ll be back blogging at better-than-full-strength on Monday.

Written by gerrycanavan

April 29, 2010 at 8:20 am

Tabdump #2

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* If you invested $100,000 on Jan. 1, 2000, in the Vanguard index fund that tracks the Standard & Poor’s 500, you would have ended up with $89,072 by mid-December of 2009. Adjust that for inflation by putting it in January 2000 dollars and you’re left with $69,114. Krugman says things have not yet turned around.

* In search of the world’s hardest language.

* Environmental refugees.

* Should we believe the thorium hype?

* Whole Foods CEO John Mackey is fixing for another boycott.

* Behold, the divorce gene. Via Eric Barker.

* And everyone is criticizing Brit Hume for suggesting on-air that Tiger Woods must become a Christian in order to be forgiven, but of course Hume was right: a well-publicized conversion experience would be a painless way for Woods to immediately rehabilitate his brand.

150,000,000

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Global warming will force up to 150 million “climate refugees” to move to other countries in the next 40 years, a new report from the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) warns.

Written by gerrycanavan

November 3, 2009 at 2:41 am

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