Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘David Gibbons

Friday Night Links!

leave a comment »

* Don’t miss the descriptions for the upcoming English courses at Marquette (including my new courses on “Utopia in America” and Moore and Gibbons’s “Watchmen”).

Preparing for Coronavirus to Strike the U.S. U.S. Health Workers Responding to Coronavirus Lacked Training and Protective Gear. Coronavirus Reappears in Discharged Patients, Raising Questions in Containment Fight. Coronavirus and the election. The pandemic must be revenue neutral. This week’s stock market meltdown, explained. You’re only as healthy as the least-insured person in society. Okay, now I’m worried.

By the way, the wall-to-wall coronavirus coverage is what coverage of climate collapse would look like if giant corporations didn’t stand to lose financially from drastic action to protect the climate and save our lives.

Democratic Leaders Willing to Risk Party Damage to Stop Bernie Sanders. Democrats float Sherrod Brown as ‘white knight’ 2020 nominee, Michelle Obama as vice president. I’m sure he has our best interests at heart. The obvious folly of a white knight convention candidate. Get excited.

* Truly disgusting smear job on Andrew Walz, the only candidate who can beat Trump.

Graduate Student Strikes Are Spreading in California. Not over yet at UCSC.

The Lies Graduate Programs Tell Themselves.

Heathrow airport expansion ruled unlawful on climate change grounds.

The typical US worker can no longer afford a family on a year’s salary, showing the dire state of America’s middle class.

Deputies in Orange County wrote false reports about their collection and booking of evidence, according to internal audits kept secret for months.

* Since chronic restriction of sleep to 6 h or less per night produced cognitive performance deficits equivalent to up to 2 nights of total sleep deprivation, it appears that even relatively moderate sleep restriction can seriously impair waking neurobehavioral functions in healthy adults. Sleepiness ratings suggest that subjects were largely unaware of these increasing cognitive deficits, which may explain why the impact of chronic sleep restriction on waking cognitive functions is often assumed to be benign.

New study says student evaluations of teaching are still deeply flawed measures of teaching effectiveness, even when we assume they are unbiased and reliable.

Fast-and-loose culture of esports is upending once staid world of chess.

* Teach the controversy.

* I have questions. A lot of questions.

A dirty secret: you can only be a writer if you can afford it.

Video-game therapy may help treat ADHD, study finds.

* ugh x-men is bad again

* …and then there was no one left to speak for me.

Upcoming English Courses at Marquette! “Utopia in America” and “Watchmen”

leave a comment »

Descriptions for the upcoming courses for Fall 2020 are up at the English department website. Here are mine:

ENGLISH 3000: CRITICAL PRACTICES AND PROCESSES IN LITERARY STUDIES

101 MWF 11:00-11:50 Professor Gerry Canavan

Course Title:  Utopia in America

Course Description: 2020 marks the 505th anniversary of Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, which inaugurated a genre of political and social speculation that continues to structure our imagination of what is possible. This course serves as an entry point for advanced study in the English discipline, using depictions of political utopias from antiquity to the present as a way to explore how both literature and literary criticism do their work. We will study utopia in canonical historical literature, in contemporary pop culture, and in the presidential election, as well as utopian critical theory from major thinkers like Fredric Jameson, Donna Haraway, Margaret Atwood, and Ursula K. Le Guin — but the major task before us will be exploring the role utopian, quasi-utopian, dystopian, and downright anti-utopian figurations have played in the work of major authors of the 20th century, among them Gabriel García Márquez, Vladimir Nabokov, Flannery O’Connor, Toni Morrison, Octavia E. Butler, and Philip K. Dick.

Assignments: Class participation, including individual and group presentations; discussion posts; three papers. Students will also construct their own utopian manifesto.

ENGLISH 4717/5717: COMICS AND GRAPHIC NARRATIVE

101 MWF 12:00-12:50 Professor Gerry Canavan

Course Title:  Watchmen

Course Description: This course surveys the history, reception, and artistic form of comics and graphic narrative in the United States, with primary exploration of a single comic miniseries that has had a massive influence on the comics industry and on the way we think about superheroes: Alan Moore and David Gibbons’s Watchmen (1986-1987)This semester ENGLISH 4717 will function almost like a single-novel “Text in Context” course; after grounding ourselves in the pre-1980s history of American superhero comics over the first few weeks of the course, we will focusing almost exclusively on Watchmen and its long afterlife in prequel comics, sequel comics, parody comics, homages, critiques, film adaptations, and, most recently, the critically acclaimed HBO sequel series (2019-2020). What has made Watchmen so beloved, so controversial, and so very influential on the larger superhero-industrial-entertainment complex? Why has DC Comics returned to Watchmen again and again, even as one of its original creators has distanced himself further and further from the work? What have different creators done, or tried to do, with the complex but self-contained narrative framework originally constructed by Moore and Gibbons? With superheroes and superhero media more globally hegemonic than ever before, what might Watchmen still have to say to us today?

Assignments: Class participation, including individual and group presentations; weekly reading journal; discussion posts; several out-of-class film screenings; one long seminar paper, several shorter papers, or creative/curational project

Written by gerrycanavan

February 28, 2020 at 4:31 pm