Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘codes

Sunday Links!

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* The science fictional sublime: the art of Penguin science fiction.

* From the syllabus of my wonderful Cultural Preservation class: “Can Auschwitz Be Saved?” and “The Myth of the Vanquished: The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum.”

* Great moments in the law school scam. Wow.

Fraternity expels 3 linked to statue noose, suspends Ole Miss chapter.

* Where the money goes: what $60,000 tuition at Duke buys you.

duke_exp

* The Definitive Guide to Never Watching Woody Allen Again.

Pedophiles Are Still Tearing Reddit Apart.

The Vampire Squid Strikes Again: The Mega Banks’ Most Devious Scam Yet.

* The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy will launch in 2015.

* Always worth relinking: StrikeDebt’s Debt Resistors’ Operations Manual.

On most policy questions of any importance, there are enough academics doing work to generate far more policy ideas than can seriously considered by our political system. When it comes to systemic risk, we have all the ideas we need–size caps or higher capital requirements–and we have academics behind both of those. The rest is politics. What we really need is for the people with the big megaphones to be smarter about the ideas that they cover.

Milwaukee’s childhood lead poisoning prevention program running out of money. Income inequality grew rapidly in Milwaukee, study finds.

Actually, climate trolls, January ended up being the fourth-warmest on record.

EPA moves to toughen pesticide safety standards for the first time in 20 years.

Scientists are appalled at Nicaragua’s plan to build a massive canal.

South Carolina Legislators To Punish College For Assigning Gay-Themed Fun Home Comic To Freshmen.

* David Graeber explains fun.

A sequel film for Farscape is in the early phases of development.

* NBC officially giving up, bringing back Heroes.

How wrong is your time zone?

Presenting the lowest possible score in Super Mario Brothers.

* The Donkey Knight Returns.

* The Legographer.

* The Amtrak Writers Fellowship.

* And now they’re saying the Voynich Manuscript might not be a hoax after all. Oh, I hope so.

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Paging Dan Brown

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Written by gerrycanavan

July 2, 2010 at 1:09 am

Lots of Monday Links

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* Game of the day: Every Day the Same Dream. (via)

* Building the best lede ever: A self-styled Nevada codebreaker [check] convinced the CIA [check] he could decode secret terrorist targeting information sent through Al Jazeera broadcasts [check], prompting the Bush White House [check] to raise the terror alert level to Orange (high) in December 2003, [check] with Tom Ridge warning of “near-term attacks that could either rival or exceed what we experience on September 11,” [check] according to a new report in Playboy. [and mate]

* Al Franken tries to convince the Kossacks that the health care bill is good. So does Jonathan Cohn. Jane Hamsher’s 10 Reasons to Kill the Senate Bill. Harry Reid, progressive hero? Progressive senators are still grumbling. What could still be sped up. What could still go wrong. Health care winners and losers (and don’t get caught on the wrong side of that line).

* Monster post at MyDD on our broken Senate.

* Good Christians pray for the death of Robert Byrd. Jesus wept.

* It’s only treason when Democrats do it.

* After 20 years, Sen. Whitehouse has finally figured out the Republican Party is not negotiating in good faith.

* Grist considers whether or not climate debt is a workable frame for ecological politics.

* Laredo, Texas, is now the country’s largest book desert.

* Sumerians Look On In Confusion As God Creates World. Via the Onion‘s top ten stories of the last 4.5 billion years, which I think I already linked to once with the dinosaurs story.

* And the stolen ‘Arbeit Macht Frei’ sign has been recovered.

Tuesday Links

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Still busy. Here’s Tuesday’s links.

* Sesame Street will parody Mad Men. Everyone is excited.

* Old-school Tweetspeak at the New York Times.

The 140-character limit of Twitter posts was guided by the 160-character limit established by the developers of SMS. However, there is nothing new about new technology imposing restrictions on articulation. During the late 19th-century telegraphy boom, some carriers charged extra for words longer than 15 characters and for messages longer than 10 words. Thus, the cheapest telegram was often limited to 150 characters.

Concerns for economy, as well as a desire for secrecy, fueled a boom in telegraphic code books that reduced both common and complex phrases into single words. Dozens of different codes were published; many catered to specific occupations and all promised efficiency.

* Mountain Dew as engine fuel.

* Play Pixel. You’ll never want to do anything else.

* Right now, Detroit is as close as any city in America to becoming a food desert, not just another metropolis like Chicago, Philadelphia, or Cleveland with a bunch of small- and medium-sized food deserts scattered about, but nearly a full-scale, citywide food desert. (A food desert is defined by those who study them as a locality from which healthy food is more than twice as far away as unhealthy food, or where the distance to a bag of potato chips is half the distance to a head of lettuce.) About 80 percent of the residents of Detroit buy their food at the one thousand convenience stores, party stores, liquor stores, and gas stations in the city. There is such a dire shortage of protein in the city that Glemie Dean Beasley, a seventy-year-old retired truck driver, is able to augment his Social Security by selling raccoon carcasses (twelve dollars a piece, serves a family of four) from animals he has treed and shot at undisclosed hunting grounds around the city. Pelts are ten dollars each. Pheasants are also abundant in the city and are occasionally harvested for dinner.

Detroiters who live close enough to suburban borders to find nearby groceries carrying fresh fruit, meat, and vegetables are a small minority of the population. The health consequences of food deserts are obvious and dire. Diabetes, heart failure, hypertension, and obesity are chronic in Detroit, and life expectancy is measurably lower than in any American city.

* Glenn Beck in CYA mode.

* How do Americans spend their day?

Written by gerrycanavan

August 4, 2009 at 6:15 pm

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