Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘charting the fall of the Republic

Barack Obama Is the First President Since the 1990s

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The headline reads, “Rusty superpower in need of careful driver: Obama built his campaign on a positive vision, but in reality he will be the first US President to manage an empire in decline.” Are we already pretending the Bush presidency never happened?

Written by gerrycanavan

January 4, 2009 at 4:31 pm

Trading in My Passport

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Igor Panarin’s prediction that the United States will dissolve into six smaller nations (previously) is getting some attention today due to a piece on the front page of The Wall Street Journal. Leave it to Steve Benen to pooh-pooh.

Slate’s Ryan Grim noted a recent report outlining Panarin’s vision for the future of the U.S.: “He predicted that the U.S. will break up into six parts — the Pacific coast, with its growing Chinese population; the South, with its Hispanics; Texas, where independence movements are on the rise; the Atlantic coast, with its distinct and separate mentality; five of the poorer central states with their large Native American populations; and the northern states, where the influence from Canada is strong.”

If this reflects Panarin’s knowledge of the country, I have a hunch we’ll be fine.

I’m just glad to see my concerns about a nighttime flight to Jersey were misplaced: North Carolina will apparently be joining the European Union too.

Paging Strange Maps

Breaking News

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A professor at the diplomatic academy of Russia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said the U.S. will break into six parts because of the nation’s financial crisis.

…“Dissatisfaction is growing, and it is only being held back at the moment by the elections, and the hope” that President- elect Barack Obama “can work miracles,” he said. “But when spring comes, it will be clear that there are no miracles.”

More at Drudge.

John Gray: ‘The Era of American Dominance Is Over’

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In the Guardian, John Gray takes the Wall Street crisis alongside the first Chinese spacewalk as a watershed moment: the end of American hegemony. I’d say that’s still a bit premature—for one, the turnover of administration will restore at least some of America’s luster internationally and reorient our still-immense wealth towards more productive ends, and second the sheer interconnectivity of the global economy means that our financial crisis threatens to take everybody else down with us—but we’re certainly moving towards a truly multipolar world, with all the good and bad that will bring.

And we’re moving there faster and faster: the Japanese are working on a space elevator, while the Chinese say they can complete an “impossible” Emdrive for use in space. This puts Obama’s support for NASA in particular (and science research in general) in context—this stuff really does matter.

Written by gerrycanavan

September 29, 2008 at 12:40 pm

Saturday Politics

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On the politics front, the new GOP line (apparently) is that Sarah Palin isn’t ready to be president after all—yet.

I’m certain that over the next couple of weeks the press will be pounding her and the campaign wanting to know where the access is. There’ll be a lot of process stories about why isn’t she talking to reporters. There’ll be a lot of noise that voters, frankly, don’t really care about—and as frustrated as the press is gonna be it’s a smart move by the campaign because, like I said, voters don’t really care about these process stories, but if she goes out and makes a mistake, that is something that [voters will] care about, and that’s something that will haunt [McCain] for awhile, so I think this is a smart move.

GOP strategist Todd Harris goes on to say that she’ll be getting prepped for as long as two weeks before she talks to anyone in the media. The Jed Report says it best:

This has got to be one of the craziest messaging decisions ever: Harris is conceding that Palin’s not even ready to be a vice presidential candidate, let alone be president.

Kevin Drum, too:

The McCain campaign is scared to death. They knew nothing about Palin before they announced her, they relied on a cursory vetting process that has turned out to be shot full of holes, they realize now that she has no settled views on any issue of national importance and could blurt out anything at any time, and they’re terrified about what might crop up next. So they’re keeping her in the deep freeze.

Has it really come to this? The absolute lack of confidence McCain has in his own pick to be vice president is mind-boggling; the absurdity of this past week truly marks a singular event in the history of our Republic, and if things go wrong it’ll be probably be used (alongside Florida 2000) to mark the start of its final decline.

This is monarchism, not democracy. A candidate for office needs to be accountable to the voters, not to a vague mish-mash of identitarian buzzwords. If we as a nation passively accept the Palin candidacy, if we demand nothing more than this from the Republicans or from ourselves, then American democracy is simply dead.

(Of course, a candidate should also be trusted to talk about something other than their own love of self, but we’re sitting by and letting John McCain fail that test, too.)

In more positive news, at least Joe Biden continues to win my respect. Give ’em hell, Joe.