Gerry Canavan

the smartest kid on earth

Posts Tagged ‘1980s

Blast from the Past

leave a comment »

An all-male troop of science fiction writers from 1987 predict 2012. Only Asimov really comes close:

Assuming we haven’t destroyed ourselves in a nuclear war, there will be 8-10 billion of us on this planet—and widespread hunger. These troubles can be traced back to President Ronald Reagan who smiled and waved too much.

Though Gregory Benford has his moment:

…the attitudes expressed in this collection of predictions will seem very outmoded and “twen-cen.”

Nailed it.

Written by gerrycanavan

July 24, 2012 at 8:20 am

The Luckiest Dreamers Who Never Quit Dreamin’

leave a comment »

Written by gerrycanavan

January 24, 2012 at 6:07 pm

Three for Wednesday

leave a comment »

* Poll: 1 In 5 Americans Believe Obama Is A Cactus. (Thanks Will!)

* Epitaphs for my career: There’s a thin line distinguishing the hyper-objective historian who distils art into data from the hyper-subjective sentimentalist who considers anything they once experienced to be worthy of celebration. Alex Jackson reviews Saturday Morning Cartoons: 1980. (Thanks Dan!)

* Bill Clinton, vegan.

Links From Yesterday

with 2 comments

A Few Other Late-Night Links

leave a comment »

A few other late-night links.

* Philip Roth has surrendered to television on behalf of the novel.

“I was being optimistic about 25 years really. I think it’s going to be cultic. I think always people will be reading them but it will be a small group of people. Maybe more people than now read Latin poetry, but somewhere in that range.”

* Chris Ware in the New Yorker.

* If Harry Potter Was Made in the 1980s, and Starred David Bowie.

* ‘Man who threw feces in courtroom draws 31-year sentence for robbery.’ Live and learn.

* The Telegraph covers the laws of internet discourse.

7. Pommer’s Law
Proposed by Rob Pommer on rationalwiki.com in 2007, this states: “A person’s mind can be changed by reading information on the internet. The nature of this change will be from having no opinion to having a wrong opinion.”

* Scientology convicted of fraud in France. See also.

* Will D.C. let J.J. Abrams have a crack at Superman? After the success of the Star Trek reboot this seems like an obvious move—and it would certainly be better than all their other attempts so far.

* Is your city recession-proof?

* Why your dryer sucks. More here.

* And Ezra Klein puts the politics behind the public option very well:

For the real liberals, the public option was already a compromise from single-payer. For the slightly less radical folks, the public option that’s barred from partnering with Medicare to maximize the government’s buying power was a compromise down from a Medicare-like insurance plan. For the folks even less radical than that, the public option that states can “opt out” of is a compromise from the straight public option. Access to the public option will be a political question settled at the state level. It is not a settled matter of national policy.

In many ways, this is a fundamentally conservative approach to a liberal policy experiment. It’s only offered to individuals eligible for the insurance exchanges, which is a small minority of the population. The majority of Americans who rely on employer-based insurance would not be allowed to choose the exchanges. From there, it is only one of many options on the exchange, and only in states that choose to have it. In other words, it has been designed to preserve the status quo and be decided on the state level. Philosophically, these are major compromises liberals have made on this plan. They should get credit for that.

Written by gerrycanavan

October 28, 2009 at 6:20 am

Links for a Thursday without Joy

leave a comment »

Links for a Thursday without joy.

* Don’t forget about him: John Hughes has died.

* Margaret Atwood, Twitterer.

* The Big Picture visits Hiroshima 64 years ago today.

* Long Vanity Fair profile of Mad Men and Matthew Weiner. Best show on TV. Via Kottke.

“Matt wants real,” said Charlie Collier, president of AMC. For Weiner, Collier continued, “it’s not television; it’s a world.” Perhaps the only other producer as committed to the rules of his imagined universe is George Lucas. “Perfectionism” is a word the show’s writers tossed around when I asked a group of them about working with Weiner. “Fetishism” was another. Alan Taylor, who has directed four episodes of Mad Men, labeled Weiner’s attention to detail “maniacal.” Call it what they will, it is a charge that is largely embraced. “We’re all a little bit touched with the O.C.D.,” Robin Veith, one of the writers, told me, describing how she and her colleagues have researched actual street names and businesses in Ossining, the suburb where Don and Betty live; checked old commuter-train schedules, so that they know precisely which train Don would take to the city; pored over vintage maps to learn which highways he would drive on.

* Towards a four-day work week.

* And Sonia Sotomayor has been confirmed, 68-31, making her the first Latina woman racist on the Supreme Court.

Written by gerrycanavan

August 6, 2009 at 11:01 pm

Toystalgia

leave a comment »

Dan Meth’s report on upcoming ’80s toy-nostalgia films contains some surprises, including John Carpenter’s ALF and a Wes Anderson movie I hadn’t even heard of yet.

Toy Movies

Atom.com: Funny Videos | Animation | TV & Movie Spoofs

Written by gerrycanavan

June 24, 2009 at 9:15 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , , , , , , , , ,